Social Media

A Quick Guide to Resizing Images in Adobe Lightroom

by Caroline Mercurio on August 14, 2017 No comments

Looking for a way to resize your images with a minimum of hassle but a maximum amount of control over export quality or in large batches? Then Adobe Lightroom may be just the photo editing you’re looking for.

There’s a lot that goes into photo editing, and no two images are ever quite alike. But whether you’ve just finished a great photoshoot or you’re putting together a batch of stock photos for a social media campaign, one thing’s for certain: you’re going to have to resize your images if you want them to look their best in your finished product.

Most websites won’t accept large images, and if your photo is too high-res, it might even look weird on some browser screens. Now, we all know the tried-and-true Photoshop method—and that’s great if you want to resize your images one by one—but really, who has that kind of time? Enter Adobe Lightroom.

See, the clever folks over at Adobe knew that photographers—and everyone else who works with images—needed a way to batch upload, resize, organize, and export their images all at once. We’re talking seconds here, people. Yet many people still see Lightroom as “baby Photoshop” or, alternatively, as too confusing or advanced for the casual user. Not so! This program pairs beautifully with Photoshop to streamline your editing process and improve efficiency, and it’s great all on its own if you’re looking for a quick and easy way to do some basic editing and organize your photos.

To get you started, we put together this simple tutorial to teach you how to resize your images in Adobe Lightroom. We promise—after a time or two this process will take you mere moments.

 

Step One: Import Images into Lightroom

Go ahead and open up Adobe Lightroom. It should open up to the Library module along the top navigation bar. Once the screen pops up, click the button on the bottom left that reads “Import.”
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
A new screen will open, and often the easiest way to batch import your images is simply to drag and drop them into the center. Once they load, all your images will be visible as thumbnails, as you can see below. For this project, we decided to use images from this romantic stock wedding photoshoot.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 

Step Two: Export the image

Still working in the Library Module, select the images you want to export. To select all of them at once, simply click the first image, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last image. All of your photos should now be selected.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
As you can see, the images will highlight and new thumbnails representing each selected image will appear along the bottom of the screen.

Now it’s time to get busy. Click the Export button (or Ctrl+Shift+E) at the bottom left of the Library module. A new window will pop up, and this is where the magic happens.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 

Step Three: Define Your Parameters

Export Location: At the top of the pop up window is a box saying “Export Location.” within this box you will see “Export to” with a drop down beside it. This is where your edited photos will end up, so go ahead and specify the folder your want to use. For our purposes, we’re using the Desktop.

The next drop-down under “Export Locations” is “Existing Files.” This option determines what happens to existing files already in your destination folder with the same name to avoid confusing duplications. In our experience, ”Ask what to do” is the safest bet.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
File Naming: The next box is the “File Naming” box. “Rename To” gives you the option to have your files renamed something different than the existing file name you uploaded. For this project, we put a custom name in the custom text box with the date and the name of the project, and selected “Custom Name – Sequence” as my our naming convention. This means that the first image will be named “08_10_17_Jones Wedding” and the subsequent images will have a number added, for example “08_10_17_Jones Wedding-1”
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
If you select filename, your edited images will have the same filename as the original images. You can also create your own file naming template by selecting Edit from the dropdown list.

 
File Settings: Now let’s scroll down to the “File Settings” box. Here’s where we can manage the quality of our final images. First off, we’re going to want to select “JPEG” as the file format, because this is the most commonly used format for web images. We also want to set the Color Space to sRGB, because it’s the color mode most monitors see best.

Now it’s time to think about image quality. Sliding the quality bar all the way to the right might seem like a good idea because it will give you the highest quality, but it will also leave you with giant image sizes, which can slow down your page load speed or even crash your site. For digital images, it’s a safe bet to set your slider to 65-80.

Don’t check “Limit file size to,” because we don’t want Lightroom to override your selections later on.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
Image Sizing: The first thing we’re going to do is check “Resize to Fit.” The dropdown will now give you several options to choose from. What you are essentially doing is selecting which edge you are sizing by—whether it’s the long or short edge, or both—from the dropdown next to the checkbox.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
Each option has it’s own specifications and nuances, so we’ve broken them down below:
 

  • If you select “Dimensions,” Lightroom will size the images as closely to the selected pixel dimensions as possible within their current aspect ratio (their width to height), and one measurement will match the specified length. For example, if we specify 1200 x 800 pixels as the dimensions, some images may be 1200 x 600 or 800 x 800. The images will not be larger than 1200 x 800
  • If you select “Width & Height” you can set the longest dimensions in both directions, therefore depending on the aspect ratio of the image, it is possible that both dimensions will differ from your specifications. The image will be sized so that the width and height are no larger than the value you set.
  • “Long Edge” and “Short Edge” are both pretty self-explanatory. The images will be sized so that the edge you specify will match the dimensions you choose, and the other dimension will vary according to the image’s aspect ratio. It’s worth noting that Lightroom will apply these changes to images regardless of their orientation. For example, if you limit only the width of the image, your portrait-oriented images will likely come out much larger than your landscape images.
  • Megapixels are the measurement system used by camera companies and combines both width and height into one number. Basically, if you’re primarily concerned about actual file size, this setting may be for you. It’s particularly useful in stock photography because these images are often priced according to image size. Downsizing an image can also help salvage an image that isn’t the best quality or one with noise issues.
  • Percentage is the newest option for resizing in Adobe Ligtroom, and it allows you to—you guessed it—resize by a certain percentage.

 
Another thing to keep in mind is that if you select “Do Not Enlarge,” your images may end up smaller than intended if the original photo is smaller than your specified sizing.

We’ve decided to limit only the long edge of these images to make sure they fit properly on a specific blog page, which is 800 pixels wide with a sidebar. Your pixel size may differ according to your needs. For example, Facebook and most other social media platforms have specific sizes that work best for them.

Now select your resolution. Resolution is mostly for printing purposes and doesn’t really matter for web, provided that you are measuring your image size above in pixels instead of inches. That being said, 72 ppi is pretty standard for screen display. However, if you are looking to print your images, standard ppi ranges from 240 to 300ppi+.

If you are measuring your image size in inches, suddenly ppi matters quite a lot, but this is generally only done when working with print materials.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
Sharpening, Metadata and More: Everything else is pretty optional and doesn’t have anything to do with image resizing, but it’s amazing how much post processing you can do in this simple “Export” box. Output sharpening allows you to sharpen your images, and there are a ton of great resources on the web that go into the various settings you can use here. For now, we’re happy with the sharpness of our images so we’re going to go ahead and move on.

You’ll also see that you have the option to add metadata, and it’s a good idea to remove your personal and location info from the image embeds. Removing unnecessary data also reduces image size.

Watermarking: If you want to watermark your images, go ahead and click the “Watermark” box, and select your watermark from the drop down. To add or edit your watermarks, select “Edit Watermark” from the drop down. If this is the first time you’re adding a unique watermark to Lightroom such as a logo, select “Graphic” where it says “Watermark Style” and upload it using the “Choose” button under “Image Options.”
 
Adobe Lightroom
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
Finally, you want to make sure “Do Nothing” is selected from the drop down under “Post-Processing”—unless you want the images to immediately open up in Photoshop, Finder, or another application after they export.

 
Step Four: Save Your Settings
We know it seemed like a lot, but the good news is that this process takes only seconds once you’re used to it—especially if you save your settings! If you want to use these settings again, save them by clicking the “Add” button at the bottom left of the Export Window, under the Preset list. Give your new preset a name and select a folder (or just leave it set to “User Presets”). Click Create.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
Now, the next time you want to use the preset, just open to the Export dialogue box and choose your setting.

 
Step Five: It’s Time to Export!
Just click that beautiful blue Export button in the Export dialogue box and that’s it! Your images will appear in your specified folder—in this case, the desktop—resized and ready for all your web projects.
 
Adobe Lightroom

 
There you have it, folks! What used to take an hour can be done in five seconds, leaving you more time to focus on what really matters—like binge watching Game of Thrones on your DVR. Or, you know, working.

Save even more time—and money—with royalty-free stock graphics. We can’t be everywhere at once, and honestly, some shots are just better left to—well, other people.

 

See the World in Stock

 

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Caroline MercurioA Quick Guide to Resizing Images in Adobe Lightroom

30 Vectors for Labeling Everything—Market Your Product Like a Pro

by Maddie Stearn on February 11, 2017 1 comment

Everything has a label—and small business owners understand this particularly well. From the product itself to social media campaigns, labels are everywhere. Labels also help combat brand fatigue by spicing up marketing materials. When your business has a sale for every major event in the year, labels are a godsend.

The takeaway? Your labels need to be certified fresh.

Stock vector labels are enormously useful for creating a wide variety of product labels. Not to rip off Portlandia, but name an object and we’ll say, “Put a (stock) label on it!” The possibilities are endless.

The GraphicStock library has thousands of labels that are also vectors, so they’re completely customizable. In our image above, we put our own spin on a label from a customizable template pack. You can find that label and more in our hand-picked gallery of 30 popular stock vector labels.

 

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Feeling inspired? Make sure to visit our royalty-free vectors library to see all 30 vector labels.

 

Download All 30 Labels

 

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Maddie Stearn30 Vectors for Labeling Everything—Market Your Product Like a Pro

#InstaFamous: The Top Hashtags for Designers on Instagram

by Caitlyn Hampton on February 1, 2017 No comments

Instagram is one of our favorite platforms for engaging with all types of creatives (spoiler: we post a lot of our favorite stock images). As a purely visual-driven social media channel, it’s an excellent way to get your design work out in front of unfamiliar eyes and embrace the impact it can have on your recognition and reach. Think of it as a tool for engagement and connection, rather than just another way to interact with friends and brands. You can create a community while advertising your talent and expertise—it’s a win-win!

Hashtags are an essential tool for getting the most out of Instagram. While it’s not nearly as important as posting quality graphics in the first place, using effective hashtags will allow you to reach more eyeballs. It’s how others discover your feed and follow topics of interest.

We researched the top hashtags for designers to help you build your brand using Instagram…and maybe even become #InstaFamous. It’s important to have a healthy mix of broad tags and also more niche tags. The more popular tags expand your audience, while the more specific ones lead to greater engagement.

These are our top picks:

Most Popular Design Hashtags

 
#graphicdesign #design #art #graphic #typography
 

General Design Hashtags

 
#designer #designers #creative #creatives #artist #artoftheday #picoftheday #digitalart #graphic #graphicart #graphics #workspace
 

Graphic Design Hashtags

 
#photoshop #illustrator #posterdesign #vector #vectorart #visualstyle
 

Branding Hashtags

 
#brand #brandidentity #branding #logo #seo
 

Illustration Hashtags

 
#illustration #cartoon #animation #aftereffects #gif
 

Typography Hashtags

 
#font #typeface #handdrawntype #calligraphy #handmadetype #lettering #typedaily #typedesign #typegang #typespire #typography
 

Web Design Hashtags

 
#web #webdesign #ux #ui #webdesigner #developer #webdeveloper #wordpress
 
These hashtags will put your work in front of a wide audience and, if you play your cards right, may even rank top in discovery—leading to potentially thousands of likes and follows.

Need some high-quality graphics to help get started on your designs? Explore our library of over 350,000 royalty-free images. You can use them for Instagram memes, and just about any other project!

Get #InstaFamous Graphics
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Caitlyn Hampton#InstaFamous: The Top Hashtags for Designers on Instagram

20 Stock Photos That Will Actually “Un-Stock” Your Advertising

by Caroline Mercurio on December 7, 2016 No comments

In advertising, you need to lead first with visuals to grab your audience’s attention. Yet not every creative team has a photographer on call with an unlimited travel budget to supply a steady stream of fresh and innovative images. Instead, the majority of marketers and designers turn to stock photographs for high quality content.

Unfortunately, some of these photos can seem “stocky”—too posed, too cliched, and too unreal—for consumers to truly connect with the message. That’s why we’ve picked 20 of our favorite photos to “un-stock” your advertising, as well as explaining the four best types of photos to look for when picking fresh visual content for your advertising.

 

Authentic Portraits

Day in and day out, customers are bombarded with photographs of retouched models in highly-posed situations. Advertising that uses images of everyday people in realistic contexts can connect with audiences at a human level, resonating with consumers’ desire for authenticity.

Portraiture with subjects who develop strong and honest rapports with the camera evoke a sense of believability and earnesty. Direct and emotive gazes without false smiles are crucial for these types of advertising portraits.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this lifestyle portrait of an elderly man at work.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this lifestyle portrait of a happy boy laughing.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this lifestyle portrait of a woman and her husband.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this lifestyle portrait of a young woman working out.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this lifestyle portrait of a pedestrian in the city.

 

Street Photography

The city is in the zeitgeist. Because we live in a constantly connected, digital world, metropolitan imagery has begun to resonate more and more with audiences, regardless of where ever they actually are.

Aesthetically, street photography appeals to viewers because of the wide array of textures and diversity of subjects it offers, as well as the frequent contrasts between structured, urban environments and their human inhabitants.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this street photograph of people in a crowd.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this photograph of graffiti on the metro.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this photograph of a young skateboarder in the city.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this photography of a tourist photographing a Vatican street.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this photograph of people on a busy street.

 

Flat Lay

Although seemingly more posed and polished than many of the visual trends we’ve highlighted, flat lay photography is having a moment. The style has it’s own kind of authenticity—the illusion of two dimensional space and the style’s fusion of geometric layouts with organic shapes appeals to an innate desire for simplicity and order.

Flat lay is especially popular for food advertising, but the aesthetic lends itself to any number of objects, from tools to plastic packaging. Using flat lay photos like these will keep your advertising fresh and on trend.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this flat lay laptop photograph.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this flat lay fresh fruits in a cone photograph.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this pills on a plate flat lay medical photograph.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this ice cream packaging bags flat lay photograph.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this flat lay tools photograph.

 

Quirky Subjects

A sense of humor, especially one that’s just slightly off-beat and not overly cliched, can really help cut through the noise in today’s oversaturated advertising landscape. Fun, quirky subjects with visually striking compositions do this by connecting with audiences through one of the most basic languages there is—humor.

To capture this trend, focus on images that feature off-center composition, bright or contrasting colors, and subjects that are just slightly weird or odd without being completely unrelatable. Think of a Wes Anderson film, but for advertising.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this quirky photograph of a business person exercising.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this quirky photograph of a grumpy middle aged woman with hair rollers.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this quirky photograph of a senior cook.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this quirky photograph of a thinking student in a cap.

 
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Stock Photos

Download this quirky photograph of a man with a red nose.

 
Ready to start creating? Download all 20 photos and more—or, if you’re looking for even more inspiration, take a look at our guide to the Hottest Design Trends of 2016.

 

Un-stock Your Ads

 

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Caroline Mercurio20 Stock Photos That Will Actually “Un-Stock” Your Advertising

50 Perfect Stock Photos For All Your Social Media Images

by Caroline Mercurio on December 2, 2016 No comments

Imagery is your most powerful tool on social media. Whether you are new to social branding or a seasoned Instagrammer, stock photos can help establish your online identity. On Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, or any other channel, engaging graphics appeal to your audience and increase engagement—which means more clicks, shares, favorites, and—ultimately—sales. In short, better social images mean better business.

But how do you create compelling images efficiently? To make sure you won’t get slapped with a copyright violation or end up with a low-quality graphic, the answer is simple: use stock graphics. It’s something professional graphic designers have been doing for ages.

To make it easy for you, we’ve curated 50 fan-favorite photos for social media designs. Take a look at our top 10 and then click the button at the bottom of the post to download the entire collection!

 
1. Backgrounds
Sometimes you want an image to speak for itself—but other times you need an eye-catching background for your message. That’s where photos like this come into play.

Stock PhotosDownload this Mosaic Background stock photo

 
2. Landscapes
Can you even look at this without feeling a sense of calm? From gorgeous seascapes to snowy mountaintops and everything in between, landscapes are perfect for any number of social media projects.

Stock PhotosDownload this Vintage Apple Orchard stock photo

 
3. Travel
Anyone up for a little #TravelTuesday? Help your readers escape their desk for a few minutes and travel the world with stunning photos of monuments around the world.

Stock PhotosDownload this Statue of Liberty stock photo

 
4. Business
We all have to make a living somehow, so it makes sense that stock photos depicting common business themes are popular on social media. Besides, who wouldn’t want their desk space to look this zen?

Stock PhotosDownload this Laptop stock photo

 
5. Fitness
Fitness is a multi-billion dollar industry—it’s no wonder that photos inspiring us to hit the weights make up a huge number of the images we see online every day (#fitspo). Stand out from the pack with visually interesting shots that look beyond the abs.

Stock PhotosDownload this Kettle Ball Workout stock photo

 
6. R&R
In this day and age, we all need to stop and catch our breath sometimes. Steal a few minutes of zen with calm-inducing photos like this one.

Stock PhotosDownload this Hot Stone Treatment stock photo

 
7. Flower Power
What is it about close-ups of flowers? The compositions are eye-catching and incredibly beautiful. So go ahead—stop and smell the roses.

Stock PhotosDownload this Monarch Butterfly and Flower stock photo

 
8. Holidays & Celebrations
Whether it’s Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, New Year’s Eve, or any of the hundreds of other holidays people around the world celebrate each year, these popular photographs take full advantage of the season.

Stock PhotosDownload this Holiday Beverage stock photo

 
9. Cute & Cuddly
It’s just a fact—cat’s rule the Internet. But don’t forget about dogs, and owls, and alpacas. Yes, we said alpacas. They’re really cute, okay? Give your audiences something they’ll love with these heartwarming images.

stock photosDownload this Cat in Sunglasses stock photo

 
10. Food
There’s a reason that Instagram food blogging is a thing. We’re obsessed with food. It can be anything—even brussels sprouts. If it’s well plated and lit perfectly, we want to eat it, and show it to our friends so that they can fantasize about eating it too.

Stock PhotosDownload this Cherries on a Wooden Background stock photo

There is no end to what you can create and share with our top 50 stock images for social. If you are looking for a little more guidance on formatting your social images, check out our post on Facebook Image Sizing.

Feeling inspired? You can download the entire curated collection as part of your GraphicStock subscription.

 

Explore our Top 50 Social Images

 

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Caroline Mercurio50 Perfect Stock Photos For All Your Social Media Images

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

by Alison Murphy on March 29, 2016 3 comments

Cover photos and banners are an excellent way to make your social media pages look more professional. It may seem a little intimidating to do this yourself, but it’s actually quite easy to do in Photoshop!

Hannah from We Lived Happily Every After is here with a quick how-to on making your own header images for Facebook, Twitter, Etsy, YouTube, and Pinterest.

We’ll start with a Facebook Cover Photo, but you can apply the same technique to any platform using the dimensions in this cheat sheet:

Social Media Banner Sizes
 

1. Size your canvas at 851×315 pixels at 72 DPI, RGB

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

2. Add a background image or texture and paste into the canvas.

GraphicStock has a huge library full of great options for all types of businesses, blogs, and brands. You can also add multiple photos if you want a collage instead of just one image.

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

3. If adding text, you can add a blur to make the words pop.

Go to Filter / Blur / Gaussian Blur. Drag the dial to the right until you get your desired blur.

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

4. Add your logo, text, and any graphic overlays of choice.

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

You can lower the opacity of the overlay layers for a cool, unique effect.

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

5. Before saving, make sure no text or important elements are within 160px of the left corner, which is where your Facebook profile photo will show up.

How to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

So what are you waiting for?! Go dress up your social media accounts!

Get Started with Backgrounds for Social Media
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Alison MurphyHow to Make Social Media Banners in Photoshop

What Every Designer Must Know About Copyrights

by Caroline Mercurio on April 10, 2015 6 comments

If Apple can amass nearly $200 billion in cash and still face lawsuit after lawsuit claiming copyright violation, it’s safe to say no “little guy” is immune.

Instead, today’s artists and designers have no choice but to study the concepts of copyright in addition to those of design. It’s for this reason we’ve outlined some of the key principles for avoiding legal confrontations both in court and online—so that artists can focus on what they do best: mastering the art of design, not the art of rights or liabilities.

In itself, just using royalty-free graphics is certainly a strategy for avoiding drama. However, the best protection ultimately comes from pairing these resources with a working knowledge of the best practices surrounding copyright law.

An Introduction to Copyright for Designers
As a very general rule, you own the sole rights to works of art that you create. Just as strangers don’t have the right to enter your home and randomly take possession of your paintings, they are generally prohibited from taking possession of your digital artwork by posting it to websites, using it to advertise their products, or selling it as their own—even if they’ve reworked it first by adding their own adjustments and modifications.

Of course, the reverse also holds true. Use the product of someone else’s work in a project without permission, and they’ll have the right to claim damages from you.

This applies not just to actual artwork, but to the mere “likeness” of artwork—meaning you can still face litigation for tracing someone else’s work and adding your own spin, regardless of whether or not you’ve drawn a profit from doing so.

This is part of the allure behind using royalty-free graphics for your design projects, as you’re free to use them in virtually any way you choose after you’ve downloaded them.

Options for Protecting Your Design Work
Many artists find it isn’t necessary to register the copyrights of their design work, as works of art are automatically protected by copyright from the moment they’re created. Registering a copyright just makes that creation and ownership easier to prove—and litigate—as it generates a public record.

You can register a piece of artwork through an attorney or through the U.S. Copyright Office for as low as $35. However, you’ll want to save yourself the postage by ignoring any advice to beat the system with what’s often called a “poor man’s copyright.” Mailing yourself a copy of your work by way of certified mail isn’t likely to hold up in court, regardless of how tightly you seal your envelope.

Finding Resources With No Strings Attached
Using images from our library isn’t nearly as complex. Members can download unlimited graphics, photos, templates, and more and use them worry-free without expiration dates or limitations on print runs.

Every graphic in our library comes with the right to keep using it forever, whether it was downloaded as a part of our unlimited subscription plan or a trial—regardless of your current membership status.

 

Explore Royalty-Free Stock Images
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Caroline MercurioWhat Every Designer Must Know About Copyrights

Graphic Stock Announce: We Have Photoshop Files

by Caroline Mercurio on April 9, 2014 1 comment

Graphic Stock is proud to announce our files are downloadable in a Photoshop format.

EPS and PDF files are vector formats. These images can be scaled to any size without losing quality. They also contain layers (just like Photoshop.) However, these files must be opened with vector editing software in order to be scaled and retain layers.

PNG and JPEG are raster formats cannot be scaled beyond their original size without losing quality (becoming pixelated or grainy). PNGs are able to contain transparency, when an image is created in such a way. Both PNGs and JPEGs are flat images, meaning that by their nature they have no layers.

If our users don’t have the appropriate software, they can’t edit graphics and retain their layers. Based on survey data the majority of our customers use Photoshop, so this is why we’ve created PSDs. PSD files contain layers but are raster images.

PSD files are made specifically for Photoshop. They contain a varying number of layers (anywhere from 5 to over 1,000) depending on how the original EPS files were organized.

Now, you can edit our images in Photoshop with more control than ever before. You can delete elements you don’t want, change how items overlap, and easily edit elements without needing to manually selecting items.

As Graphic Stock, we’re super happy to give you an insane amount of seriously amazing and useful files. We hope this makes you, our beloved customers, happy too.

To find PSD files in our library, refine your search on the left hand side of the screen under “Download Format,” and then click, “Update Search,” as you can see here:

PSDDESKTOP

Check out this little preview of our total offering of PSD files. Get a subscription and head to our library for more!

vector-set-of-calligraphic-design-elements-913-1941 white-paper-numbered-banners-913-2094 64-1013-A0066 232-1013-A0234 vector-set-of--isolated-photo-frames-913-1931 yellow-notice-papers-with-elements-for-attaching-paper-913-2133 100-1013-A0102153-1013-A0155

 

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Caroline MercurioGraphic Stock Announce: We Have Photoshop Files

Graphic Stock New Feature Announce: How To Create Lightboxes

by Caroline Mercurio on March 28, 2014 No comments

Graphic Stock’s new lightbox feature makes organizing images and vector graphics for a project really easy! You can also use the feature to create and curate collections.

Use lightboxes to consolidate and label clips right inside the Graphic Stock interface. Add images to a lightbox, name it, and download from your lightbox to more easily keep track of your favorites.

All it takes is a Graphic Stock username, login and password. Get started with a 7 day free trial subscription.

After logging in, begin browsing the enormous library to build your first lightbox.

Search for textures, backgrounds, icons, infographic templates and much more by selecting from the drop down menus on the left, or by entering a key word that relates to the type of clip you’re looking for.

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Here you can roll over an image, see a larger version of it, and add it to a lightbox by clicking “Add to Lightbox.”

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Next a pop-up will allow you to add the clip to a lightbox you’ve already created, or it will allow you to create and name a new one.  Name the lightbox something that relates to what you’re working on, or give it a title that will help you easily recall where you’ve stored certain clips. After typing a name, click “Add a new Lightbox” to finish.

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You can also click on a specific clip and then add it to a lightbox, or create a lightbox by clicking on the grey “Save Now” button.

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You can refer to the lightboxes you’ve created and favorites you’ve saved by selecting the “All Lightboxes” button in the upper right corner.

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Click anywhere on a lightbox or lightbox title to open it. Share your project bins via email or social media using the link provided at the top in blue text.

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If you are using lightboxes for a project currently and want to get secure feedback from client, upgrade now to a Premium Subscription.

Have fun searching for additional vectors and images. You can add them to any of the bins you’ve created or keep creating new ones. It’s that easy!

Here’s a sample of a lightbox we created including 20 staff favorites.

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To really enhance your lightboxes, focus on a specific theme or topic when clip hunting. If you get distracted or find inspiration elsewhere, that’s ok too because you can just as easily create a separate lightbox to organize what you find.

It also helps to be selective about which images you add so the collections are all curated to your liking.

If you have any questions about lightboxes, or anything else on the Graphic Stock site, feel free to reach out to support@videoblocks.com. If you have a collection that you’re really excited about or proud of, share it with us at social@videoblocks.com or tweet to @GraphicStock_ and we’d be happy to share your collection!

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Caroline MercurioGraphic Stock New Feature Announce: How To Create Lightboxes

Are Estimates and Invoices Costing You Clients?

by Caroline Mercurio on March 10, 2014 2 comments

Are Estimates and Invoices Costing You Clients?

If you’re in the design business—or, really, any business—you’ve probably learned a few things about clients: they want as much as they can get for free, password and they want to know that the money they do spend is going to a dedicated professional.

Graphic Stock can help you with the free bit. We can also help you save time and increase profitability.

Today, we want to share some tips to help you gain an edge in the 70-465 way your value is perceived.

Kick Up Your Correspondence

To demonstrate your highest value as a vendor, it’s important to establish professionalism with every bid, proposal, estimate, invoice, and point of visual or written contact (in print and online).

Why? Because if you come off as uninspired or amateur in your first pre-sale impression, what reason will your prospects have to offer a second chance? And if your post-sale mailings and invoices appear unprofessional, how likely is a customer to separate this emotion from your actual product or service?

Consider the differences between typesetting all of your messaging in Times New Roman (or, heaven forbid, Comic Sans) and instead making use of the following:

 

Distinguish Your Brand

Utilizing photos of yourself and/or your team is a great way to showcase your company culture while relaying trust and approachability—but if you don’t have these photos (or you don’t have a team), it’s not a bad idea to approximate with something representative of your trade, credentials, or key market strengths.

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Alternatively, Mustaches

Of course, you could also ignore all this and leverage the undeniable draw of mustaches.

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Caroline MercurioAre Estimates and Invoices Costing You Clients?